journaling-junkie

Anonymous asked:

Hello! I think I need some help. My problem is I've got bunch of plots in mind however, when it comes to writing, I just can't turn my imagination into words. Sometimes I finish writing but on process of rewriting, I get unsatisfied and delete the whole story. T_T) I don't know. I think it's partially because of I'm not a naive English user. Grammars, word choosing, and speaking languages have bothered me a lot. Could you give me some advice? Thank you.

slitheringink answered:

First off: DON’T EVER DELETE ANYTHING YOU WRITE. EVER. NO MATTER HOW TERRIBLE YOU THINK IT IS. Any and all writing is useful, I promise. Make a folder on your computer and stuff the files in there, or keep everything in a notebook, or a box, or a treasure chest. You never know what ideas you may end up using later. You could be throwing away the framework for the Next Great American Novel (TM) for all you know! Old writing is also useful to see how much you’ve improved!

That being said, it’s perfectly fine that you’re not a native English speaker, and I know learning and working in a new language can be frustrating, but don’t let it get to you. Practice and you will get better.

I would recommend that you expose yourself to the language as much as possible. Read often, and you’ll begin to pick up how everything is pieced together. You’re bound to have questions, of course, so finding a buddy who is good at English will help, or really any native speaker. It would help you to check out some grammar resources, and possibly snag a book or two on the subject.

Some Resources I Use:

I hope that helps. If anyone else has any good resources for this anon, let me know.

-Morgan

writersflow

writersflow:

iowawomensarchives:

The Treasure in the Old Will: Iowa Women’s Archives Inherits Valuable Nancy Drew Collection

There were no missing documents, phony relatives, or suspicious fires — just a straightforward bequest from Peggy Wirt, whose mother, the late Mildred Wirt Benson, was the original ghostwriter of the Nancy Drew series. But the collection that was recently left to the Iowa Women’s Archives calls to mind another mystery trope – the hidden treasure: the set of 150 books, written and signed by Benson, was appraised at $115,000. According to IWA Curator Kären Mason, however, the true value of the donation lies in further documenting an important figure in American popular culture…

…University of Iowa Professor Emeritus Carolyn Stewart Dyer has written of Nancy Drew as a feminist icon who inspires women “to persevere, to achieve, to ask questions and find answers”:

Most compelling of the many elements of the stories women told us about reading Nancy Drew were the accounts of how, as girls, they saw in Nancy an alternative to conventional notions of what a woman could be. Women in many occupations told of learning from Nancy to see adventure in solving problems and the joy of self-reliance. These qualities, they said, led them to the futures they chose as lawyers, researchers, librarians, and detectives, among other roles.

Read the full press release here.

oh my goodness, they are gorgeous!

writersflow

atlasobscura:

LIBRARIES ON THE BEACH

BY ALLISON MEIER / 09 JUL 2014
At Atlas Obscura, we’ve written about libraries in cemeteries, on the backs of burros, in Masonic lodges, and other unexpected places around the world. Yet with summer in season and the train to the Rockaways inviting us away from the office here in NYC, there idea of finding a good read on the beach is irresistible. 
Books and the beach go together like sun and sand, and around the world libraries have been set up right by the shore. From Spain to Tel Aviv, pop-up mobile carts and elaborately designed structures are offering books to beachgoers to read for free.
bookporn
theparisreview:

When Charlotte Brontë was thirteen and her brother, Branwell, was twelve, they designed and wrote a series of tiny books: “Measuring less than one inch by two inches, the books were made from scraps of paper and constructed by hand. Despite their diminutive size, the books contained big adventures, written in ink in careful script.”
For more of this morning’s roundup, click here.

theparisreview:

When Charlotte Brontë was thirteen and her brother, Branwell, was twelve, they designed and wrote a series of tiny books: “Measuring less than one inch by two inches, the books were made from scraps of paper and constructed by hand. Despite their diminutive size, the books contained big adventures, written in ink in careful script.”

For more of this morning’s roundup, click here.

its-a-writer-thing

Beginning the Editing Process

fictionwritingtips:

You’re done with your first draft…now what?

Okay, so just because you’ve reached your writing goals, that doesn’t mean you’re “finished”. Chances are you’ll still have more drafts to tackle. Editing is a long process and it will take some time before your novel is where you want it. Here are a few of my own “rules” when it comes to starting the editing process.

Give yourself some time off.

When you’re in the zone, it can be hard to give yourself a break, but sometimes it’s necessary. Don’t start editing the day after you finish your first draft. Let your brain rest. This is not only necessary for your health, but it allows you to view your manuscript in a different way. Right now, you’re too invested in your story to see it from an outsider’s perspective. Give yourself enough time to forget about all the details of your story. If you read it again in month, it will feel fresh again.

Try to tackle one issue at a time.

Avoid trying to edit everything all at once. For example, tackle plot issues first. Make sure your novel is cohesive and there aren’t giant plot holes. Make room for plot points you want to explore further and think about what you can add or cut out. Next you might want to look at your sentence structure. Does everything sound good? Does it flow? Is your wording confusing? Give every aspect of writing the time and attention it deserves and avoid jumping all over. I usually save grammar and spelling issues until my final draft.

Allow for as many drafts as necessary.

Limiting yourself to a certain number of drafts isn’t going to cut it. Sure, you need to stop editing at some point and you need to learn that you’ll never be completely satisfied with how something turns out, but give yourself enough time to work out problems. If you’re on the 4th draft of your novel, that’s fine. You don’t need to limit yourself to 2 or 3 drafts. Figure out what works for you and tackle each problem.

-Kris Noel